SUMMER DETECTING: BEAT THE HEAT!

SUMMER DETECTING: BEAT THE HEAT!

“Either snow or rain or heat or gloom of night or Game of Thrones is on stays these detectorists from the swift completion of their appointed rounds” – Opposite of the US Postal Service Creed

It is always easy to come up with a reason not to detect.  Raining, too cold,  a good movie is on. Kind of the opposite of being a mailman.  And with much of the United States under intense heat advisories with heat indices well above 100, you’d have to be crazy to get out there and hunt, right?

Wrong.  We’re hunting year round.  Here are some tips for hunting in the heat you might not have thought of:

...or are you just glad to see me?

…or are you just glad to see me?

GO BANANAS
A legendary middle Tennessee detectorist recently shared this tip with Detecting365.  Bananas are sweet in taste and cold in nature. They are able to clear intestinal “heat,” adding moisture and eliminating toxins.

For best results, eat a banana about 15-20 minutes before actually starting detecting, that way it kicks in out in the field and the positive effects last the longest.

START EARLY OR LATE
On the hottest days, we will try and get permission in advance, and get started at daylight, with the goal of quitting before lunch.  If we don’t have advance permission, we will start cruising around early and try to catch a property owner outside to avoid knocking too early.

Likewise, sometimes it is best to wait until late in the afternoon and hunt an hour before dark until an hour after dark.  Substitute an all-day hunt, with three or four such short hunts per week.

"The Bomb"

“The Bomb”

PERMETHRIN
With the heat comes ticks and chiggers.   Permethrin is the only thing I’ve found that will keep them off of me.  Be very careful just to treat your clothes with it, and not get it on your skin.  It will last a couple of washings.  I get mine from Amazon.

DRESS APPROPRIATELY
Cotton is the worst material to wear in the heat. It soaks up sweat and holds moisture against your skin like a wet towel, which makes your body temperature increase. Evaporation cools the skin.  Your clothing should allow sweat to evaporate. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend  light-weight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothes.  Avoid dark colors — dark clothes absorb the heat, while light colors reflect light and heat.  Moisture-wicking stuff are great.   Baseball caps aren’t a good idea – try to go with something wide-brimmed and well ventilated.

HIT THE WATER
To me, it doesn’t matter how hot it is if I am knee-deep in water.   Obviously, swimming holes, creeks, and beaches are places where you can detect in the water.

PHOTO CREDITS
gags9999
Fiona Henderson



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