BUT WHAT ABOUT THE KIDS

BUT WHAT ABOUT THE KIDS

Lil Digger and her Teknetics Delta 4000

Lil Digger and her Teknetics Delta 4000

As many of you already know, my daughter, Lil Digger, loves to metal detect. In fact she has gotten very good in most of the aspects. She knows how to dig proper, how to extract the target, how to fill the hole back in, and how to be responsible with her digging tool. She is an expert with her pinpointer, and is always willing to dig and treasure. The only problem is, finding her a decent detector.

Lil digger is seven, and very good with the computer, as most seven year old are. So, why is it non of the manufacturers recognise this? Do they think our children are stupid? Look at the junior models and you will see nothing but useless garbage. There isn’t even a target identifier on most of them, just a meter. How the heck do they expect a child how to know what the meter is saying, I am 37 and I can barely remember seeing a meter on anything. Wouldn’t a digital readout be a little more appropriate? Or how about a target picture screen with pictures of the coins that light up. These could be done and probably cheaper than the meters.

Lil Digger loves the treasure!

Lil Digger loves the treasure!

The depth, they say, for the junior models is up to 6 inches. I have yet to see a demonstration of this claim. I also don’t understand why they have no pinpoint, armrest, multi tones, and other features everyone looks for in a detector.

We have all been there, digging trash all day, and not getting any good objects. It isn’t fun, and I am sure it isn’t fun for them either. It is time the little ones are taken seriously. Their first impression of the hobby is important and will stay with them forever. If the companies don’t start realising that our children are capable of understanding and operating electronics more than most of us can, I am afraid this hobby may fizzle out. Below are a few ideas for the companies, I doubt they will see this, but in hopes they might.

Teknetics:
Modify the 4000 with a lower arm rest, and shorten the upper arm. My Lil Digger loves my old 4000 but can’t swing it very well, the armrest is in her armpit. It is light enough, and she can fully understand the display.

Fisher:
Adapt the F2 like above

Garrett:
Take the 250 since it has pinpoint, and modify the armrest length. The lower part is able to get where she needs, also shorten the bend where the handle is to lower the display. A small lighter coil, and wow, what a machine for a youngster to use.

Whites:
Wake up, its not 1970 anymore. Catch up and develop the first real kids detector.

Minelab:
With all your genius ideas, and mind blowing capabilities, you can’t figure out how to make a reliable and fun Kids detector, try the Excalibur, but dumb it down a little. And shorten things up like above. Attach a smaller coil, and you have the top selling kids detector ever made.

Final Thoughts

I guess I am day dreaming, but wouldn’t that be nice to go out detecting with your child, knowing that they have just as good of a chance at finding the older stuff as you have? Watching them leave happy and feeling successful. I can’t see how we can keep them interested when it seems like the detector companies won’t take them seriously.

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Photo Credits
Shon Fox



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